Princes and princesses make homecoming court more relevant

Rather than crowning only two seniors this year, Student Recognition expanded the Homecoming Court to include students from all grades. This new change allowed underclassmen to participate, yet still gave seniors the credit they deserve.

Rather than crowning only two seniors this year, Student Recognition expanded the Homecoming Court to include students from all grades. This new change allowed underclassmen to participate, yet still gave seniors the credit they deserve.

Nathan Desai

How could anyone dislike Homecoming?

Everything about the week is spectacular. From Powderpuff to the football game to the dance, Homecoming is a week that is often considered one of the most sacred parts of the high school tradition.

Rather than crowning only two seniors this year, Student Recognition expanded the Homecoming Court to include students from all grades. This new change allowed underclassmen to participate, yet still gave seniors the credit they deserve. Illustration by Shuyi Qi.

MVHS does a great job to make sure every student can have as much fun as possible during the week. Dress-up days encourage the student body to be creative, while events like the rally allow students to display their class spirit. And the school is still trying to pursue that vision of student participation with their newest addition to Homecoming week—an increase in court.

During halftime of the football game this year, more than just two students were recognized as Homecoming court royalty. In addition to announcing one Homecoming king and queen as the senior winners, the other three classes had their own prince and princess on the court. This change allowed Homecoming week to be special, not only for the seniors, but for everyone, as all students had the opportunity to elect people they are familiar with.

“I remember being a freshman and voting for senior court. I knew no one, and it didn’t mean that much to me,” Student Recognition Commission lead senior Sherry Roohi said. Student Recognition instituted this change in to allow more students to be involved in the Homecoming experience.

“I remember being a freshman and voting for senior court. I knew no one, and it didn’t mean that much to me,” Student Recognition Commission lead senior Sherry Roohi said. Student Recognition instituted this change in order to encourage more students to participate and be recognized during Homecoming week.

According to Student Recognition, the change was made to prevent potential landslide victories during senior year voting. They noted that most homecoming kings and queen in the past have been ASB officers. Allowing potential officers to be elected princes or princesses as freshmen, sophomores or juniors might prevent the same people from monopolizing future ballots, leveling the playing field.

Of course, it does take away the special senior-only experience, but it encourages participation for the other classes. But the fact remains that 75 percent of the student population had been missing out on the experience of choosing a king or queen, but with this new system, that is no longer the case. We’re finally allowing everyone to be involved.