Careers are not set in stone

ARTTEC+Inc.+came+with+the+intention+to+talk+to+MVHS+about+the+ARTTEC+program.+ARTTEC+is+a+program+that+allows+high+school+students+to+have+hands-on+experience+with+lighting%2C+music+recording%2C+and+film+production+for+a+fee+of+%2425+a+year.+Photo+by+Stephanie+Chang.
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Careers are not set in stone

ARTTEC Inc. came with the intention to talk to MVHS about the ARTTEC program. ARTTEC is a program that allows high school students to have hands-on experience with lighting, music recording, and film production for a fee of $25 a year. Photo by Stephanie Chang.

ARTTEC Inc. came with the intention to talk to MVHS about the ARTTEC program. ARTTEC is a program that allows high school students to have hands-on experience with lighting, music recording, and film production for a fee of $25 a year. Photo by Stephanie Chang.

ARTTEC Inc. came with the intention to talk to MVHS about the ARTTEC program. ARTTEC is a program that allows high school students to have hands-on experience with lighting, music recording, and film production for a fee of $25 a year. Photo by Stephanie Chang.

ARTTEC Inc. came with the intention to talk to MVHS about the ARTTEC program. ARTTEC is a program that allows high school students to have hands-on experience with lighting, music recording, and film production for a fee of $25 a year. Photo by Stephanie Chang.

Stephanie Chang

ARTTEC Inc. came with the intention to talk to MVHS about the ARTTEC program. ARTTEC is a program that allows high school students to have hands-on experience with lighting, music recording, and film production for a fee of $25 a year. Photo by Stephanie Chang.

In a room meant to hold over 70 people, only three students occupied the seats: one reporter, another reporter, and a student that came wandering by for somewhere to sit during his empty period.

On Nov. 2, the chosen speaker from Arts Related Technical Training for Entertainment Careers program came to represent the musical expertise of the entertainment industry. Armed with an informative Powerpoint and a band that has opened for Good Charlotte and worked with Smash Mouth, they probably expected to find more than just three students, two of them reporters, to attend their presentation.

Not only was it awkward for the band members and ARTTEC, it was embarrassing for us students as well. In a school where many start exploring careers at an early age, it is surprising how empty the room was when given the opportunity to dig into something radically different than the math and sciences. It is almost as if students have ruled out certain career paths as they move on with a preconceived criteria for their job set out for themselves.

According to a survey conducted by El Estoque last year, the following positions were the most prominent amongst students: engineer, doctor, and other careers in medicine. While these are certainly profitable career choices, it does not hurt to consider other options. In fact, if students do attend some of these presentations and try out these programs, they may find that their true passion may not lie in, perhaps, engineering, but in the music industry as an agent for rising artists.

There have also been ongoing issues with students wasting the Career Center’s potential. The unenthusiastic response this event has garnered is just another example of many on how students dismiss resources given to them.

While some may argue that the Career Center should have publicized the event more — because the bulletin on School Loop and the flyers on the doors of various classrooms are not enough for them — it is the responsibility of students to look for chances to explore their futures The Career Center is merely a tool to help students; it becomes pointless if you don’t use it.