Synopsys State Science Fair Qualifiers and their journey

Synopsys State Science Fair qualifiers talk about their journey

Synopsys State Science Fair Qualifiers and their journey

niharika

Laasya Koduru

Synopsys Science Fair (typically held in April) participants typically have the option of either pursuing a new research topic or expanding upon a previous one. Every year, Synopsys chooses a selected number of participants to move onto states. For senior Vivek Kamarshi, expanding upon a previous research idea seemed to be the best idea for him. Having performed research at a Stanford lab since the summer of his sophomore year, Kamarshi chose to expand on his previous research with new and significant findings that weren’t discovered the year before. Kamarshi has explored how one particular biological drug is able to cause a certain impact with the contact of a viral infection.

On the other hand, junior Triya Roy decided to pursue a new project. Roy, who is focusing on studying Type II Diabetes with fruit flies, initially believed she didn’t do well in the Science Fair due to less interest in her project itself.

“I wanted to model a Type II Diabetes and fruit flies so I did this by rearing them on a high sugar diet, several high sugar diets with different sugars,” Roy said. “The project was just analyzing the progression of it through behavioral changes and also measuring molecular changes within the fruit flies.”

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I wanted to model a Type II Diabetes and fruit flies so I did this by rearing them on a high sugar diet, several high sugar diets with different sugars. The project was just analyzing the progression of it through behavioral changes and also measuring molecular changes within the fruit flies.”

— Junior Triya Roy

In preparation for the state Synopsys Science Fair, Roy hopes to finish up the small parts throughout her research and reach a clear conclusion. After states, Roy aspires to get her research project published as well.

While qualifying for the State Synopsys Science Fair came as a surprise for Roy and Kamarshi, it was expected for junior Suhas Prasad. In his sophomore year, Prasad and his partner junior Raj Palleti went to Synopsys Internationals — the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF).

“Not a flex or anything, but it is kind of a downgrade from last year, but it is still big,” Prasad said. “[Lots] of people want to go there and if someone is inviting you somewhere to present your project, it is still a big thing no matter the prestige of it.”

Similar to Prasad, Kamarshi dedicated countless hours to his Synopsys project. While research can take a lot of time and independent studying, it is easy to pursue if one is passionate, according to Kamarshi.

“You can get these opportunities by doing research yourself and Ms. Fallon is really awesome about creating those research opportunities,” Kamarshi said. “I think research, even as a high schooler, is very accessible.”

Though research takes a lot of time, anyone can become successful in research, according to Prasad. This time and effort required eventually spreads interest in research among the public as well.

“You don’t need to work in a fancy lab or have a mentor to succeed; in fact, there is always appreciation to those that simply work by themselves at home,” Prasad said. “It was the appreciation of such judges that gave my project the credibility of being named an Intel ISEF Finalist, and that prestige in exchange attracts the view of audiences that would have previously turned a blind eye to it.”

 

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You can get these opportunities by doing research yourself and Ms. Fallon is really awesome about creating those research opportunities. I think research, even as a high schooler, is very accessible.”

— Senior Vivek Kamarshi